Approaching the Tyrannosaur Paddock
Nick Folkman - Los Angeles
Currently co-writing Massive Chalice for Double Fine Productions.

Let's talk about storytelling and adventures and films and television and books and photography and cinematography and all kinds of music except country and traveling and how breakfast is the best meal of the day.

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Posts tagged with "Paul Thomas Anderson."

thedissolve:

Boogie Nights ratchets up the shredded-nerve intensity to John Cassavetes levels gradually and deliberately. Magnolia more or less begins there. It’s a film of purposeful and often brave excess, one that makes a core virtue of going too far, of pushing scenes and moments past their breaking point. Boogie Nights is perfect. Magnolia is ragingly, deliberately imperfect, a raw and ragged film that’s all the more powerful for its visible seams.”

Following Paul Thomas Anderson’s universally adored breakout film, Boogie Nights, the universe (or at least New Line) more or less wrote the director a blank check for his next film. In this month’s Encore, Nathan Rabin looks at the resulting follow-up, the beautifully imperfect Magnolia. [Read more…]

Posted on August 12th, 2014 at 8:00 AM
Tags ~ Magnolia ~ Paul Thomas Anderson ~ Film Analysis
Reblogged from thedissolve

pickledelephant:

Paul Thomas Anderson sits next to the hand-cranked camera used to film the first part of the prologue of Magnolia (1999)

pickledelephant:

Paul Thomas Anderson sits next to the hand-cranked camera used to film the first part of the prologue of Magnolia (1999)

Posted on June 14th, 2014 at 9:33 AM
Tags ~ Magnolia ~ Paul Thomas Anderson ~ bts
View image in High Res
Source: pickledelephant
Reblogged from caryfuckmenowa

scottlava:

“Why are frogs falling from the sky?”

scottlava:

Why are frogs falling from the sky?”

Posted on May 3rd, 2014 at 9:22 AM
Tags ~ Magnolia ~ Paul Thomas Anderson ~ Scott Campbell
View image in High Res
Source: scottlava
Reblogged from odalisquexvx
"We broke the film down into five sequences, and D was where everything spirals out of control after Dirk has been fired. It was sort of notorious - in shooting it, matching didn’t matter, so everybody could get freed up: ‘It’s sequence D, it’s a fucking free for all, cocaine madness.’ So the camera moves to reflect that. That sequence in Goodfellas where Ray Liotta is running around, everybody responded to it. I got this sick to my stomach feeling.

I was working as a messenger in LA at the time and I would do coke all day long and run around. I swear Goodfellas accurately portrayed what that feels like. There’s one shot in that Boogie Nights sequence that I really feel good about, when Heather Graham snorts a line of coke and the focus shifts from the mirror to the coke to her and it’s blurry for half a second; it’s a very quick shot, then it whips over to Julianne Moore and then Heather brings her head up. That’s the one shot where I can go, yeah, that’s what it was like to my eye. If you’ve ever leaned down to do a line, it’s a really odd moment where you feel gross about what you’re doing but you’re in this panic and frenzy. You’re so close to something your eye is trying to adjust. It’s this weird, blurry feeling."
Paul Thomas Anderson on Boogie Nights and cocaine.
(via ericrohmer)

John C. Reilly: When he blanks and goes postal here, it was kind of like that was really happening to Mark. It was like day six of the shoot, we were all like fully melting down, and he was just way beyond it. He could not take another second more of this environment that we were in. He was just like—gone. I’m really freaking out, like “whose line is it, Mark aren’t you supposed to say something, uh, uh—” yeah. And he did that all the time!

Paul Thomas Anderson: I only really planned out half of “Jessie’s Girl” because the sequence was supposed to be half as long, because I hadn’t planned on this shot of Mark where he just kind of blanks out. That was just something that happened. We planned the whole fuckin’ sequence out to music but I only planned it out to half of “Jessie’s Girl.” I didn’t care about the second half because I knew we’d be out of the house by that point. But it turns out when we kept playing “Jessie’s Girl” over this shot that it got to this wonderful bridge in the song for the whole shootout thing. I don’t know if I explained that well, but it was just a massive fucking serendipity. I’m pretty good at planning the shots out, but not this fucking good.

- Boogie Nights director’s commentary


Paul Thomas Anderson and Jonny Greenwood scoring Inherent Vice.

Paul Thomas Anderson and Jonny Greenwood scoring Inherent Vice.